Late HIV Diagnoses Among Black/African American Individuals, 2018

TargetHIV

While 6 out of 7 Black/African Americans know their HIV status, in 2018, significant proportions learned their HIV diagnoses when their disease was at a late stage. Among certain subgroups, almost half received the news late. Note: These data are from 42 jurisdictions with complete laboratory reporting.

These jarring disparities are reported in the February 2021 MMWR, Care Outcomes Among Black or African American Persons with Diagnosed HIV in Rural, Urban, and Metropolitan Statistical Areas — 42 U.S. Jurisdictions, 2018. Below are select highlights:

  • For context, in 2018, in the 42 reporting jurisdictions, 14,502 Black/African American individuals received a diagnosis of HIV infection. Most lived in metropolitan areas (80.6%). 
  • Regardless of residency, from one-fourth to one-quarter received late diagnoses.
  • Sub-groups with the highest percentage being late diagnoses were: females in rural areas; persons 45-54 years; and males whose HIV was attributable to heterosexual contact.

Overall, 77.1% were linked to HIV care within one month of diagnoses and 62.9% were virally suppressed within 6 months of diagnoses. Both figures are well below Ending the HIV Epidemic goals.

Access HIV and African American People (CDC) to put these data into context.

We'd like your feedback

Was this page helpful?
I found this page helpful because the content on the page:
Check all that apply
I did not find this page helpful because the content on the page:
Check all that apply
Please include an email address if you would like a response
Please include an email address if you would like a response